Malcesine
Welcome to Malcesine, a place where walks, nature and sport are at ease with local traditions. Malcesine is on the east coast of Lake Garda, at the feet of Monte Baldo. The town is nestled on the shores of one of the narrowest parts of the Lake where is similar to a Fjord and with the mountain slopes rising steeply behind it. Malcesine, like many other Lake Garda towns, is very old and has its origins in prehistory: archaelogical digs have discovered many pile-built lake dwellings. Over the course of centuries, this area has been subject to many invasions and migrations of people from northern Europe. Malcesine, with its historic and romantic twists and turns is, and has been, a place of interest and refuge for artists. This small town, clustered around its castle, still has strong links to its medieval origins. The historic centre is a labyrinth of small streets reflecting the local businesses of the town: shops, boutiques, artisan, painter and sculptor workshops and showrooms, bars, restaurants and ice-cream parlours. Thanks to the mild climate of Malcesine, it is a great place to visit in all seasons.


Lake Garda
The northern part of the Lake is a narrow piece of water sitting between the mountains of the Baldo range, the highest peaks of which are over 2000 m.a.s.l. The southern part of the Lake, to the north of the Pianura Padana, is much wider and surrounded by gently rolling hills. The Lake is of typical Glacial formation: 5-6 million years ago the Lake was formed by glacial erosion of a pre-existing depression caused by Alpine rivers. The Lake therefore looks like a huge valley. The vast basin effect of the Lake makes the climate more temperate: less likely to be frosty in the winter and less humid and oppressively hot in the summer. The many winds that blow over the Lake mean that the micro climates and weather conditions change from one place to another. The Lake, especially in the Northern part, is an ideal place to practice many water sports such as sailing, windsurfing and kitesurfing: this is especially due to the presence and regularity of the winds that blow there. At every moment of the day, the Lake offers different, breathtaking views, colours, lights and scents.


Monte Baldo
The Monte Baldo chain of mountains, stretching for about 40km from north east to south west, has a surface area of approximately 320 km and a height ranging between 65m and the peak of Valdritta at 2218m being it highest point. The two mountainsides lining the lakeshore have very different aspects: that on the western side is steep with cliffs, sheer faces, hidden crags and gulleys and sparse vegetation; the eastern slopes are much less rocky and have more abundant vegetation. If you leave from the lakeside and head towards the top of Monte Baldo you will soon notice the changes in climate and vegetation: lower down there is an evergreen belt next to the Lake with typical Mediterranean plants encouraged by a mild climate – olives, grapes, oleander, citrus plants, lavender; towards 400m asl woods of oak and chestnut begin, followed by, up to 800m, ash trees and pine. Above 1000m beech forests start with many ancient trees visible and this is added to above 1600m by the birch woods. The variety of vegetation on Monte Baldo is the reason why it is often referred to as “the garden of Europe”. From Malcesine to the summit of Monte Baldo there are many different trekking and bike trails with different kind of difficulty levels as well as duration, so giving such a big choice for every training and expectations. From Malcesine to S. Michele (middle station) you can take many trails not so difficult or long and part of them are asphalted. Once you have reached Tratto Spino (Monte Baldo station) you can find different paths with many places to rest if you want to spend a day in a quite place. For those who are more sporty, from this same place other different trails start, some of them really difficult. At the tourist office, it’s possible to ask for a guide, where you will find a map of all the marked trails.

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